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ILL Handbook

Library System Identifiers | Interlibrary Loan Policies | Interlibrary Loan Procedures | Appendix – Copyright Guidelines

Library System Identifiers

School Library System

The School Library System is a cooperative library system serving public and non-public school libraries. It provides these libraries with a systematic method for sharing library resources.

  • Capital Region BOCES School Library System (CRB SLS) (Albany, Schoharie, Schenectady, Saratoga Counties)
  • Hamilton-Fulton-Montgomery BOCES (HFM SLS)
  • Questar III SLS (Rensselaer, Columbia, Greene Counties)
  • Washington-Saratoga-Warren-Hamilton-Essex (WSWHE SLS)

Capital District Library Council for Reference and Research Resources (CDLC)

The Capital District Library Council is a library system which provides interlibrary loan services to its members. Member libraries are comprised of Greater Capital District area academic (such as FMCC) and special libraries, and public and school library systems. The HFM SLS is a member.

New York State Interlibrary Loan Network (NYSILL)

The New York State Interlibrary Loan Network serves the entire research community of New York State. Serious research (e.g. ERIC documents) requests that cannot be filled through the SLS or CDLC are referred to NYSILL through CDLC. The HFM SLS processes these requests for its membership.

Public Library Systems

A public library system is a cooperative library system serving public libraries in its region. It provides interlibrary loan service to its member public libraries. They are members of CDLC. With point-to-point interlibrary loan, it is no longer necessary to go through system headquarters to borrow from a CDLC member library.

Interlibrary Loan Policies

A. Definition

An interlibrary loan is a transaction in which materials and copies of materials are made available by one library to another.

B. Purpose

The purpose of interlibrary loan is to provide access to resources not available in the user’s library. An active interlibrary loan program, however, should be no substitute for the development of adequate building collections based on local needs.

C. Scope

  1. The final decision regarding the loan of a resource is left to the discretion of the school library media specialist at the lending library.
  2. A print, non-print resource or a copy of a print resource may be requested from another library through the School Library System. (SLS)
  3. The following types of resources may not be loaned on a usual basis. However, these items may be available by special agreement. Check with individual libraries for lending policies.
    a. Rare, unique or valuable material which would be difficult or impossible to replace
    b. Bulky or fragile items which would create shipping problems
    c. Resources in demand at the lending library
    d. Reference books and other resources
  4. The loan period will be four weeks unless an alternate period is specified by the lending library.
  5. The lending library may limit the number of items loaned pertaining to a single subject.

D. Copyright Compliance

The current copyright law shall be adhered to at all times. (See Appendix)

  1. The acceptable methods of requesting materials from other libraries are outlined in the Procedures manual (page 5).
  2. All interlibrary loan requests must be submitted or approved by library personnel before submission.
  3. All ILL transactions must be sent between borrowing and lending libraries. (No materials should be sent directly to patrons.)

F. Responsibilities of the School Library System

  1. The SLS Office will maintain a Union List of Periodicals of the participating school library media centers that will be incorporated in CaDiLaC Online.
  2. The SLS Office will issue a Directory of School Library Personnel.

G. Violation of Policy

  1. The SLS Director should be notified of violations of this policy.
  2. The SLS Office will endeavor to rectify problems or violations of the approved interlibrary loan policy as set forth in this Handbook.

H. Reviewed/Revised

The interlibrary loan policy will be reviewed periodically and revised as set forth in the current SLS Plan of Service.

Interlibrary Loan Procedures

Introduction

This procedures manual expands and clarifies the Interlibrary Loan Policies.

ILL Electronic Etiquette

When using email to place or respond to a person-to-person request, please observe the following:

  • In the email subject line type: ILL (book title) when you are requesting an item.
  • Respond promptly to the person making the request as to whether the book will be loaned or not.
  • Keep a copy of the request for statistical purposes.

When sending an electronic interlibrary loan request to the entire listserv, please observe the following:

  • In the email subject line type: ILL (book title).
  • Do not respond to the request if you do not have the item being requested.
  • Once you know you have or will be receiving the items you need, send a message to the listserv that you do not need any more items. It is a closed request.
  • Respond promptly and directly to requester only.
  • Keep a copy of the request for statistical purposes.

Use HFM SLS listserv for a broad subject request ONLY in the HFM system when securing multiple copies or materials for a unit of study

I. Borrowing

ILL transactions may be subject to Copyright restrictions. (See Appendix)
It is the borrower’s responsibility to monitor the number of ordered copies.

A. Request

1. After verifying that the desired material is not in your media center check in the following locations:

  • HFM Online Catalog
  • CaDiLaC Online
  • HFM SLS Office (if unable to locate using above resources)

Request materials from the locations in the following order:

  • HFM schools
  • All other school library systems (CRB, Questar III, WSWHE)
  • Public Library Systems
  • FMCC
  • Academic Libraries
  • Special Libraries

NOTE: Materials may be held in several locations. Requests should be
spread among different holders, not concentrated on a few libraries.

2. Provide the following information as completely and neatly as possible.

  • Title
  • Author
  • Call Number
  • Your Contact Information

3. Choose the library’s preferred method of contact (i.e. fax, email, phone, online request).

  • For In-System check the HFM BOCES SLS Directory of Library Personnel.
  • For Out-of-System check CDLC’s web site (www.cdlc.org/). Contact SLS office for passwords.

4. Keep a record of all transactions. These will be used for monthly SLS statistics.

Accurate record keeping and statistical reporting are vital to the ongoing evaluation and revision of the interlibrary loan program and process.

  • The borrowing and lending libraries are responsible for keeping statistical records of all interlibrary loan transactions. These records must include filled and unfilled requests. Unfilled items are items that are:
    • not received at all
    • not received in a timely manner
    • not available
    • non-lendable
  • A Monthly Interlibrary Loan Statistics form will be sent to each library.

The completed statistics report is due at the SLS Office for collating and reporting purposes.

B. When Materials Arrive

  1. Make a record of when material is received and when it is due.
  2. Charge the resource out to the patron following your local library procedure.
  3. The period of loan may be renewed at the discretion of the lending library. The sender should be contacted prior to the due date.
  4. Resources may be recalled by the lending library, if necessary. In such cases the borrower should return item promptly.

C. Return of Materials

  1. All materials should be returned promptly. Photocopied materials need not be returned.
  2. Material should be inspected prior to return. If item is lost or damaged;
    Responsibility
    a. Replacement of item, for purposes of this policy, is defined as the actual physical replacement of the lost or destroyed item, via a method mutually agreed upon between the two libraries.
    b. The lending/borrowing library should be informed as soon as possible of damage or loss.
    Costs
    a. Replacement cost is defined as current list price of in-print resources.
    b. For out-of-print resources, an equivalent title may be agreed upon. In such cases, a processing fee may be applied.
  3. Record date item was returned.

Loaning

A. Filling a Request

Please reply promptly to all ILL requests.

  1. If the resource requested is AVAILABLE be sure:
    • School identification is clearly stamped or labeled on the item.
    • Note any serious physical defects (loose binding, ink marks on page 12 and 14, etc.) on the book pocket or other prominent place.
    • Include due date on loaned resource.
    a. Due date should be computed as four weeks from date of loan.
    b. Consider delivery schedules and school vacation periods.
    • Clearly note any limitations regarding the loan, i.e., restrictions on use.
    • Keep track of ILL transactions for statistical purposes.
    • Securely package, label and send by the most efficient means.
  2. When the resource is NOT AVAILABLE:
    • Keep a copy of the request for statistical purposes.
    • Promptly notify requesting library that materials are non-lendable.

B. When Materials Are Returned

  1. Check in the resource.
  2. Inspect the resource for missing items and for damage. If the resource is damaged, then;
    • Responsibility
    a. Replacement of item, for purposes of this policy, is defined as the actual physical replacement of the lost or destroyed item, via a method mutually agreed upon between the two libraries.
    b. The lending/borrowing library should be informed as soon as possible of damage or loss
    • Costs
    a. Replacement cost is defined as current list price of in-print resources.
    b. For out-of-print resources, an equivalent title may be agreed upon. In such cases, a processing fee may be applied.
  3. Record date resource is returned.
  4. Record statistics of the transaction.
    Accurate record keeping and statistical reporting are vital to the ongoing evaluation and revision of the interlibrary loan program and process.
    • The borrowing and lending libraries are responsible for keeping statistical records of all interlibrary loan transactions. These records must include filled and unfilled requests. Unfilled items are items that are:
    • not received at all
    • not received in a timely manner
    • not available
    • non-lendable
    • A Monthly Interlibrary Loan Statistics form will be sent to each library. The completed statistics report is due at the SLS Office for collating and reporting purposes.

C. Overdue Resources

Notice of overdue materials shall follow the lending library’s normal
procedures.

Revised and Approved:

Appendix – Copyright Guidelines

The following is intended to highlight those sections of the 1978 Copyright law which may affect interlibrary loan arrangements. More detailed and various interpretations are available throughout library literature.

Section 107

Limitations on Exclusive Rights: Fair Use

Fair use allows copying without permission from, or payment to, the copyright owner where the use is reasonable and not harmful to the rights of the copyright owner.

Register of Copyrights, 1975

The “fair use” section applies to items copied for teaching, both single and multiple copies for classroom use, research, criticism, comment, news reporting and scholarship and is dependent upon four criteria:

a. The purpose and character of use (i.e., commercial vs. non-profit,
educational).
b. The nature of the copyrighted work.
c. The amount of proportion of work copied in relation to the work as a whole.
d. The effect of the use on a work’s value or potential market.

Section 108

Limitations on Exclusive Rights: Reproduction by Libraries and Archives

Library copying that may exceed fair use is authorized in Section 108. A library may make copies as authorized by Copyright Law, if they meet three criteria:

a. Reproduction or distribution is not done for commercial advantage;
b. Library collections are open to the public or available to outside researches;
c. Copies must include notice of copyright.

Guidelines for Interlibrary Loan

Systematic photocopying of copyrighted materials is prohibited; however, section 108g) (2) permits interlibrary arrangements that do not have, as a result or effect, copying done in such aggregate quantity as to substitute subscription or purchase. Aggregate quantity is defined to prohibit excessive copying from a single periodical or material title as follows:

  1. NO MORE THAN SIX COPIES OR SIX ARTICLES, PUBLISHED WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF DATE OF REQUEST, FROM THE SAME PERIODICAL TITLE MAY BE COPIED WITHIN ANY CALENDAR YEAR.
  2. No more than six filled requests per requesting entity (i.e., the same requesting library) from a single work (such as poetry, fiction) for the entire period the work is protected by copyright.
  3. Copies may be made beyond limitations if the requesting entity has within its collection, or an order, a copy or subscription for the materials of which a copy is being requested.
  4. Requests for copying must be accompanied by representation that request conforms with copyright guidelines (applying to the last five years), CCG, or with copyright law, CCL (applying to more than five years previous).
  5. The requesting (borrowing) library shall keep records of all filled requests for copies to which these guidelines apply.

Copyright Guidelines require recordkeeping for five years for photocopies. Should a library be challenged on its compliance with copyright, it would be required to show records for five years.

Fair Use Guidelines

2. PREPARATION OF EDUCATIONAL MULTIMEDIA PROJECTS USING PORTIONS OF COPYRIGHTED WORKS

These uses are subject to the Portion Limitations listed in Section 4.They should include proper attribution and citation as defined in Sections 6.2.

2.1 By Students: Students may incorporate portions of lawfully acquired copyrighted works when producing their own educational multimedia projects for a specific course.

2.2 By Educators for Curriculum-Based Instruction: Educators may incorporate portions of lawfully acquired copyrighted works when producing their own educational multimedia projects for their own teaching tools in support of curriculum-based instructional activities at educational institutions.

3. PERMITTED USES OF EDUCATIONAL MULTIMEDIA PROJECTS CREATED UNDER THESE GUIDELINES

Uses of educational multimedia projects created under these guidelinesare subject to the Time, Portion, Copying and Distribution Limitations listed in Section 4.

3.1 Student Use: Students may perform and display their own educational multimedia projects created under Section 2 of these guidelines for educational uses in the course for which they were created and may use them in their own portfolios as examples of their academic work for later personal uses such as job and graduate school interviews.

3.2 Educator Use for Curriculum-Based Instruction: Educators may perform and display their own educational multimedia projects created under Section 2 for curriculum-based instruction to students in the following situations:

3.2.1 for face-to-face instruction,

3.2.2 assigned to students for directed self-study,

3.2.3 for remote instruction to students enrolled in curriculum-based courses and located at remote sites, provided over the educational institution’s secure electronic network in real-time, or for after class review or directed self-study, provided there are technological limitations on access to the network and educational multimedia project (such as a password or PIN) and provided further that the technology prevents the making of copies of copyrighted material.

If the educational institution’s network or technology used to access the educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines cannot prevent duplication of copyrighted material, students or educators may use the multimedia educational projects over an otherwise secure network for a period of only 15 days after its initial real-time remote use in the course of instruction or 15 days after its assignment for directed self-study. After that period, one of the two use copies of the educational multimedia project may be placed on reserve in a learning resource center, library or similar facility for on-site use by students enrolled in the course.

Students shall be advised that they are not permitted to make their own copies of the educational multimedia project.

3.3 Educator Use for Peer Conferences: Educators may perform or display their own educational multimedia projects created under Section 2 of these guidelines in presentations to their peers, for example, at workshops and conferences.

3.4 Educator Use for Professional Portfolio Educators may retain educational multimedia projects created under Section 2 of these guidelines in their personal portfolios for later personal uses such as tenure review or job interviews.

4. LIMITATIONS – TIME, PORTION, COPYING AND DISTRIBUTION

The preparation of educational multimedia projects incorporating copyrighted works under Section 2, and the use of such projects under Section 3, are subject to the limitations noted below.

4.1 Time Limitations Educators may use their educational multimedia projects created for educational purposes under Section 2 of these guidelines for teaching courses, for a period of up to two years after the first instructional use with a class. Use beyond that time period, even for educational purposes, requires permission for each copyrighted portion incorporated in the production. Students may use their educational multimedia projects as noted in Section 3.1.

4.2 Portion Limitations Portion limitations mean the amount of a copyrighted work that can reasonably be used in educational multimedia projects under these guidelines regardless of the original medium from which the copyrightedworks are taken. In the aggregate means the total amount of copyrighted material from a single copyrighted work that is permitted to be used in an educational multimedia project without permission under these guidelines. These limitations apply cumulatively to each educator’s or student’s multimedia project(s) for the same academic semester, cycle or term. All students should be instructed about the reasons for copyright protection and the need to follow these guidelines. It is understood, however, that students in kindergarten through grade six may not be able to adhere rigidly to the portion limitations in this section in their independent development of educational multimedia projects. In any event, each such project retained under Sections 3.1 and 4.3 should comply with the portion limitations in this section.

4.2.1 Motion Media Up to 10% or 3 minutes, whichever is less, in the aggregate of a copyrighted motion media work may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines.

4.2.2 Text Material Up to 10% or 1000 words, whichever is less, in the aggregate of a copyrighted work consisting of text material may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines. An entire poem of less than 250 words may be used, but no more than three poems by one poet, or five poems by different poets from any anthology may be used. For poems of greater length, 250 words may be used but no more than three excerpts by a poet, or five excerpts by different poets from a single anthology may be used.

4.2.3 Music, Lyrics, and Music Video Up to 10%, but in no event more than 30 seconds, of the music and lyrics from an individual musical work (or in the aggregate of extracts from an individual work), whether the musical work is embodied in copies or audio or audiovisual works, may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as a part of a multimedia project created under Section 2. Any alterations to a musical work shall not change the basic melody or the fundamental character of the work.

4.2.4 Illustrations and Photographs The reproduction or incorporation of photographs and illustrations is more difficult to define with regard to fair use because fair use usually precludes the use of an entire work. Under these guidelines a photograph or illustration may be used in its entirety but no more than 5 images by an artist or photographer may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2. When using photographs and illustrations from a published collective work, not more than 10% or 15 images, whichever is less, may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2.

4.2.5 Numerical Data Sets Up to 10% or 2500 fields or cell entries, whichever is less, from a copyrighted database or data table may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines. A field entry is defined as a specific item of information, such as a name or Social Security number, in a record of a database file. A cell entry is defined as the intersection where a row and a column meet on a spreadsheet.

4.3 Copying and Distribution Limitations Only a limited number of copies, including the original, may be made of an educator’s educational multimedia project. For all of the uses permitted by Section 3, there may be no more that two use copies only one of which may be placed on reserve as described in Section 3.2.3.

An additional copy may be made for preservation purposes but may only be used or copied to replace a use copy that has been lost, stolen, or damaged. In the case of a jointly created educational multimedia project,each principal creator may retain one copy but only for the purposes described in Sections 3.3 and 3.4 for educators and in Section 3.1 for students.

5. EXAMPLES OF WHEN PERMISSION IS REQUIRED

5.1 Using Multimedia Projects for Non-Educational or Commercial Purposes Educators and students must seek individual permissions (licenses) before using copyrighted works in educational multimedia projects for commercial reproduction and distribution.

5.2 Duplication of Multimedia Projects Beyond Limitations Listed in These Guidelines Even for educational uses, educators and students must seek individual permissions for all copyrighted works incorporated in their personally created educational multimedia projects before replicating or distributing beyond the limitations listed in Section 4.3.

5.3 Distribution of Multimedia Projects Beyond Limitations Listed in These Guidelines Educators and students may not use their personally created educational multimedia projects over electronic networks, except for uses as described in Section 3.2.3, without obtaining permissions for all copyrighted works incorporated in the program.

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